Bible Study, Doctrine & Disciplines of the Bible Series, Intro, Theological Study, Theology, Topical Study, Uncategorized

Excited to Share

I am excited to share with you about an upcoming series reflective of my teaching from fall 2018. My objective with this series is to call women to the reading and study of God’s Word, provide support for sound doctrine, and dispel theological confusion in those disciplines and doctrines. When we do not know and understand good theology, we risk living out bad theology. 

Women need theology; the study of God is not merely for our good but for the glory of God himself. Doctrine of the Word of God is the very foundation of theology, Christian belief based on Scripture. In its four applications, doctrine is believed, practiced, confessed, and taught. It is Christian belief that involves not just our head but our whole being. “For nearly 2000 years, the church has constructed sound theology based on Scripture. Because Scripture is the written Word of God and, as such, the ultimate authority for what the church is to believe and how it is to live, it is the foundation for good theology.” Writes Professor of theology, Dr. Gregg Allison.

Within this series, Doctrine & Disciplines of the Bible, our study will glance at inspiration of Scripture, inerrancy and infallibility of Scripture, and Scripture’s authority and sufficiency. With a correct posture, the reader will be invited to read the Bible well and do the hard work of Bible study while handling the Word of God rightly. Although the study will not be exhaustive in this online context, I believe the average reader will find it informative. In a sense, we will be getting back to the basics.

As a reminder, the studies are more than a devotional, yet less than a Bible study. However, the reader will need to open her Bible and read through the indicated scriptures (biblical support) to fully benefit from the content. Some in-depth posts in this particular series will require more than one sitting to work through. Appropriately, the studies will post once weekly.

Recreated for the purpose of supplementing my teaching and discipleship, this series is meant to be more than information transfer. Confronting the reader with doctrinal truths, heart application will manifest as theological adjustments, discerning attitudes, and  putting into practice the spiritual disciplines. It is my heartfelt prayer that the reader might come to know Christ and enjoy his Word in a greater way. And as in all things, that God himself might receive glory for any fruit of my humble efforts. 

A preface to these posts in June and July, I would be remiss if I did not list my sources for Doctrine and Disciplines of the Bible:

Paul Enns, The Moody Handbook of Theology

Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology

Millard Erickson, Christian Theology

Charles Ryrie, Basic Theology

John Frame, Systematic Theology

Michael Horton, Pilgrim Theology

Gregg R. Allison, 50 Core Truths of the Christian Faith

The Baptist Faith & Message 2000

The Chicago Statement of Biblical Inerrancy

The London Baptist Confession of Faith

Danny Akin, Charles Quarles; SEBTS Class Notes

George Guthrie, Read the Bible for Life

Howard and William D. Hendricks, Living By the Book

R.C. Sproul, Can I trust the Bible?

Donald Whitney, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life

David Mathis, Habits of Grace

Kevin DeYoung, Taking God at His Word

Sinclair Ferguson, From the Mouth of God

David Garner, Did God Really Say?

Carson and Nielson, God’s Word, Our Story

Michael Catt, The Power of Surrender

Tim Keller, It’s All About Jesus

R.C. Sproul, 5 Things Every Christian Needs to Grow

Jason Allen, Sola: How the Five Solas are Still Reforming the Church

John Mac Arthur, The Sufficiency of Scripture Part One

Heath Lambert, Sufficiency

D.A. Carson, R.T. France, J. Alec Motyer, Gordon J. Wenham, The New Bible Commentary

Uncategorized

Reflections

It’s been a week of ups and downs and some days felt as if they were circling round and round. God blessed with personal ministry opportunities, as well as time for reading and writing. I’m wrapping up the week reflecting on my takeaway from my pastor’s sermon. I’ve had these on my desk since Sunday:

Am I content?

Do I have a servant’s heart?

Do I rest and rely on God?

Just this morning, I ran across a John Broadus quote that I believe drove home these three questions, “An unthankful and complaining spirit is an abiding sin against God, and a cause of almost continual unhappiness; and yet how common such a spirit is. How prone we seem to be to forget the good that life knows, and remember and brood over its evil – to forget its joys, and think only of its sorrows – to forget thankfulness, and remember only to complain.” May we cherish the moments God has given and may He find me resting in his grace, with a grateful heart, fully reliant on Him.